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  1. Transnasal endoscopic removal of malformation of the odontoid process in a patient with type I Arnold-Chiari malformation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Grammatica, A; Bonali, M; Ruscitti, F; Marchioni, D; Pinna, G; Cunsolo, E M; Presutti, L

    2011-08-01

    The endoscopic endonasal approach is emerging as a feasible alternative to the trans-oral route for the resection of the odontoid process, when the latter produces a compression of the brainstem and cervicomedullary junction. This type of approach has some advantages, such as excellent pre-vertebral exposure of the cranio-vertebral junction in patients with small oral cavities and the possibility to avoid the use of mouth retractors. A typical case of a 24-year-old male patient with a previous diagnosis of type I Arnold-Chiari Malformation, suffering from a posterior dislocation of the odontoid process causing severe anterior compression of the brainstem, is presented to stress the potential of this technique. Trans-nasal endoscopic removal of the odontoid process was performed and resolution of the ventral compression of the brainstem was achieved. This report demonstrates that in selected cases, an endoscopic endonasal approach should now be considered an excellent alternative to the traditional trans-oral approach.

  2. Pathogenesis and Cerebrospinal Fluid Hydrodynamics of the Chiari I Malformation.

    PubMed

    Buell, Thomas J; Heiss, John D; Oldfield, Edward H

    2015-10-01

    This article summarizes the current understanding of the pathophysiology of the Chiari I malformation that is based on observations of the anatomy visualized by modern imaging with MRI and prospective studies of the physiology of patients before and after surgery. The pathogenesis of a Chiari I malformation of the cerebellar tonsils is grouped into 4 general mechanisms.

  3. Hydrodynamic and Longitudinal Impedance Analysis of Cerebrospinal Fluid Dynamics at the Craniovertebral Junction in Type I Chiari Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Bryn A.; Kalata, Wojciech; Shaffer, Nicholas; Fischer, Paul; Luciano, Mark; Loth, Francis

    2013-01-01

    Elevated or reduced velocity of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) at the craniovertebral junction (CVJ) has been associated with type I Chiari malformation (CMI). Thus, quantification of hydrodynamic parameters that describe the CSF dynamics could help assess disease severity and surgical outcome. In this study, we describe the methodology to quantify CSF hydrodynamic parameters near the CVJ and upper cervical spine utilizing subject-specific computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations based on in vivo MRI measurements of flow and geometry. Hydrodynamic parameters were computed for a healthy subject and two CMI patients both pre- and post-decompression surgery to determine the differences between cases. For the first time, we present the methods to quantify longitudinal impedance (LI) to CSF motion, a subject-specific hydrodynamic parameter that may have value to help quantify the CSF flow blockage severity in CMI. In addition, the following hydrodynamic parameters were quantified for each case: maximum velocity in systole and diastole, Reynolds and Womersley number, and peak pressure drop during the CSF cardiac flow cycle. The following geometric parameters were quantified: cross-sectional area and hydraulic diameter of the spinal subarachnoid space (SAS). The mean values of the geometric parameters increased post-surgically for the CMI models, but remained smaller than the healthy volunteer. All hydrodynamic parameters, except pressure drop, decreased post-surgically for the CMI patients, but remained greater than in the healthy case. Peak pressure drop alterations were mixed. To our knowledge this study represents the first subject-specific CFD simulation of CMI decompression surgery and quantification of LI in the CSF space. Further study in a larger patient and control group is needed to determine if the presented geometric and/or hydrodynamic parameters are helpful for surgical planning. PMID:24130704

  4. Chiari malformation Type I surgery in pediatric patients. Part 1: validation of an ICD-9-CM code search algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Ladner, Travis R.; Greenberg, Jacob K.; Guerrero, Nicole; Olsen, Margaret A.; Shannon, Chevis N.; Yarbrough, Chester K.; Piccirillo, Jay F.; Anderson, Richard C. E.; Feldstein, Neil A.; Wellons, John C.; Smyth, Matthew D.; Park, Tae Sung; Limbrick, David D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Administrative billing data may facilitate large-scale assessments of treatment outcomes for pediatric Chiari malformation Type I (CM-I). Validated International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) code algorithms for identifying CM-I surgery are critical prerequisites for such studies but are currently only available for adults. The objective of this study was to validate two ICD-9-CM code algorithms using hospital billing data to identify pediatric patients undergoing CM-I decompression surgery. Methods The authors retrospectively analyzed the validity of two ICD-9-CM code algorithms for identifying pediatric CM-I decompression surgery performed at 3 academic medical centers between 2001 and 2013. Algorithm 1 included any discharge diagnosis code of 348.4 (CM-I), as well as a procedure code of 01.24 (cranial decompression) or 03.09 (spinal decompression or laminectomy). Algorithm 2 restricted this group to the subset of patients with a primary discharge diagnosis of 348.4. The positive predictive value (PPV) and sensitivity of each algorithm were calculated. Results Among 625 first-time admissions identified by Algorithm 1, the overall PPV for CM-I decompression was 92%. Among the 581 admissions identified by Algorithm 2, the PPV was 97%. The PPV for Algorithm 1 was lower in one center (84%) compared with the other centers (93%–94%), whereas the PPV of Algorithm 2 remained high (96%–98%) across all subgroups. The sensitivity of Algorithms 1 (91%) and 2 (89%) was very good and remained so across subgroups (82%–97%). Conclusions An ICD-9-CM algorithm requiring a primary diagnosis of CM-I has excellent PPV and very good sensitivity for identifying CM-I decompression surgery in pediatric patients. These results establish a basis for utilizing administrative billing data to assess pediatric CM-I treatment outcomes. PMID:26799412

  5. Complications and Resource Utilization Associated With Surgery for Chiari Malformation Type 1 in Adults: A Population Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, Jacob K.; Ladner, Travis R.; Olsen, Margaret A.; Shannon, Chevis N.; Liu, Jingxia; Yarbrough, Chester K.; Piccirillo, Jay F.; Wellons, John C.; Smyth, Matthew D.; Park, Tae Sung; Limbrick, David D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Outcomes research on Chiari Malformation Type 1 (CM-1) is impeded by reliance on small, single-center cohorts. Objective To study complications and resource utilization associated with adult CM-1 surgery using administrative data. Methods We used a recently-validated ICD-9-CM code algorithm to retrospectively study adult CM-1 surgeries from 2004–2010 in California, Florida, and New York using State Inpatient Databases. Outcomes included complications and resource utilization within 30 and 90 days of treatment. We used multivariable-logistic regression to identify risk factors for morbidity and negative binomial models to determine risk-adjusted costs. Results We identified 1,947 CM-1 operations. Surgical complications were more common than medical at both 30 (14.3% vs 4.4%) and 90 days (18.7% vs 5.0%) postoperatively. Certain comorbidities were associated with increased morbidity; for example, hydrocephalus increased the risk for surgical (odds ratio [OR]=4.51) and medical (OR=3.98) complications. Medical but not surgical complications were also more common in older patients (OR=5.57 for oldest vs youngest age category) and males (OR=3.19). Risk-adjusted hospital costs were $22,530 at 30 days and $24,852 at 90 days postoperatively. Risk-adjusted 90-day costs were more than twice as high for patients experiencing surgical ($46,264) or medical ($65,679) complications than patients without complications ($18,880). Conclusion Complications after CM-1 surgery are common, and surgical complications are more frequent than medical. Certain comorbidities and demographic characteristics are associated with increased risk for complications. Beyond harming patients, complications are also associated with substantially higher hospital costs. These results may help guide patient management and inform decision making for patients considering surgery. PMID:25910086

  6. Validation of an International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision Code Algorithm for Identifying Chiari Malformation Type 1 Surgery in Adults.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Jacob K; Ladner, Travis R; Olsen, Margaret A; Shannon, Chevis N; Liu, Jingxia; Yarbrough, Chester K; Piccirillo, Jay F; Wellons, John C; Smyth, Matthew D; Park, Tae Sung; Limbrick, David D

    2015-08-01

    The use of administrative billing data may enable large-scale assessments of treatment outcomes for Chiari Malformation type I (CM-1). However, to utilize such data sets, validated International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9-CM) code algorithms for identifying CM-1 surgery are needed. To validate 2 ICD-9-CM code algorithms identifying patients undergoing CM-1 decompression surgery. We retrospectively analyzed the validity of 2 ICD-9-CM code algorithms for identifying adult CM-1 decompression surgery performed at 2 academic medical centers between 2001 and 2013. Algorithm 1 included any discharge diagnosis code of 348.4 (CM-1), as well as a procedure code of 01.24 (cranial decompression) or 03.09 (spinal decompression, or laminectomy). Algorithm 2 restricted this group to patients with a primary diagnosis of 348.4. The positive predictive value (PPV) and sensitivity of each algorithm were calculated. Among 340 first-time admissions identified by Algorithm 1, the overall PPV for CM-1 decompression was 65%. Among the 214 admissions identified by Algorithm 2, the overall PPV was 99.5%. The PPV for Algorithm 1 was lower in the Vanderbilt (59%) cohort, males (40%), and patients treated between 2009 and 2013 (57%), whereas the PPV of Algorithm 2 remained high (≥99%) across subgroups. The sensitivity of Algorithms 1 (86%) and 2 (83%) were above 75% in all subgroups. ICD-9-CM code Algorithm 2 has excellent PPV and good sensitivity to identify adult CM-1 decompression surgery. These results lay the foundation for studying CM-1 treatment outcomes by using large administrative databases.

  7. Chiari malformation Type I surgery in pediatric patients. Part 1: validation of an ICD-9-CM code search algorithm.

    PubMed

    Ladner, Travis R; Greenberg, Jacob K; Guerrero, Nicole; Olsen, Margaret A; Shannon, Chevis N; Yarbrough, Chester K; Piccirillo, Jay F; Anderson, Richard C E; Feldstein, Neil A; Wellons, John C; Smyth, Matthew D; Park, Tae Sung; Limbrick, David D

    2016-05-01

    OBJECTIVE Administrative billing data may facilitate large-scale assessments of treatment outcomes for pediatric Chiari malformation Type I (CM-I). Validated International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) code algorithms for identifying CM-I surgery are critical prerequisites for such studies but are currently only available for adults. The objective of this study was to validate two ICD-9-CM code algorithms using hospital billing data to identify pediatric patients undergoing CM-I decompression surgery. METHODS The authors retrospectively analyzed the validity of two ICD-9-CM code algorithms for identifying pediatric CM-I decompression surgery performed at 3 academic medical centers between 2001 and 2013. Algorithm 1 included any discharge diagnosis code of 348.4 (CM-I), as well as a procedure code of 01.24 (cranial decompression) or 03.09 (spinal decompression or laminectomy). Algorithm 2 restricted this group to the subset of patients with a primary discharge diagnosis of 348.4. The positive predictive value (PPV) and sensitivity of each algorithm were calculated. RESULTS Among 625 first-time admissions identified by Algorithm 1, the overall PPV for CM-I decompression was 92%. Among the 581 admissions identified by Algorithm 2, the PPV was 97%. The PPV for Algorithm 1 was lower in one center (84%) compared with the other centers (93%-94%), whereas the PPV of Algorithm 2 remained high (96%-98%) across all subgroups. The sensitivity of Algorithms 1 (91%) and 2 (89%) was very good and remained so across subgroups (82%-97%). CONCLUSIONS An ICD-9-CM algorithm requiring a primary diagnosis of CM-I has excellent PPV and very good sensitivity for identifying CM-I decompression surgery in pediatric patients. These results establish a basis for utilizing administrative billing data to assess pediatric CM-I treatment outcomes.

  8. Ethical Implications of an Incidentally Discovered Asymptomatic Chiari Malformation in a Competitive Athlete

    PubMed Central

    Kirschen, Matthew P.; Illes, Judy

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The clinical and ethical implications of an asymptomatic 17-year-old competitive football player incidentally found to have a type 1 Chiari malformation without a syrinx on brain imaging are discussed. Considering that patients with Chiari malformations can sustain irreversible neurologic injury or death after a mild head injury, and given the lack of data describing the risk of catastrophic injury after head trauma, the ethics of clearing this athlete to return to play are reviewed. PMID:25470168

  9. Lumbar subdural cerebrospinal fluid collection with acute cauda equina syndrome after posterior fossa decompression for Chiari malformation Type I: case report.

    PubMed

    Darwish, Houssein A; Oldfield, Edward H

    2016-09-01

    This report describes the circumstances of a patient with a cauda equina syndrome due to the development of a lumbar subdural CSF collection with ventral displacement of the cauda equina shortly following posterior fossa decompression for Chiari malformation Type I (CM-I). This unusual, but clinically significant, complication was successfully treated with percutaneous drainage of the extraarachnoid CSF collection. Although there are a few cases of intracranial subdural hygroma developing after surgery for CM-I, often attributed to a pinhole opening in the arachnoid, as far as the authors can determine, a spinal subdural hygroma associated with surgery for CM-I has not been recognized.

  10. Stenogyria - not only in Chiari II malformation.

    PubMed

    Bekiesinska-Figatowska, Monika; Duczkowska, Agnieszka; Brągoszewska, Hanna; Duczkowski, Marek; Mierzewska, Hanna

    2014-12-15

    Stenogyria, meaning multiple small compacted gyri separated by shallow sulci, is reported in the literature in association with Chiari II malformation (CM II) which in turn is reported in association with myelomeningocele (MMC). The authors present five cases of stenogyria (and other abnormalities found in CM II, like callosal hypoplasia/dysplasia, agenesis of the anterior commissure, hypoplasia of the falx cerebri) in children without the history of MMC or any other form of open spinal dysraphism. In these cases stenogyria was associated with Chiari I malformation, rhombencephalosynapsis and spina bifida. Stenogyria, which is not a true neuronal migration disorder, should not be mistaken for polymicrogyria which is also present in CM II. It is histologically different from polymicrogyria because the cortex is normally organized. Also on MRI, the general sulcal pattern is preserved in stenogyria, while it is completely distorted in polymicrogyria. The authors conclude that features traditionally attributed to CM II, like stenogyria, occur not only in the population of patients with MMC as opposed to the widely accepted theory.

  11. Effect of craniovertebral decompression on CSF dynamics in Chiari malformation type I studied with computational fluid dynamics: Laboratory investigation.

    PubMed

    Linge, Svein O; Mardal, Kent-A; Helgeland, Anders; Heiss, John D; Haughton, Victor

    2014-10-01

    The effect of craniovertebral decompression surgery on CSF flow dynamics in patients with Chiari malformation Type I (CM-I) has been incompletely characterized. The authors used computational fluid dynamics to calculate the effect of decompression surgery on CSF flow dynamics in the posterior fossa and upper cervical spinal canal. Oscillatory flow was simulated in idealized 3D models of the normal adult and the CM-I subarachnoid spaces (both previously described) and in 3 models of CM-I post-craniovertebral decompressions. The 3 postoperative models were created from the CM model by virtually modifying the CM model subarachnoid space to simulate surgical decompressions of different magnitudes. Velocities and pressures were computed with the Navier-Stokes equations in Star-CD for multiple cycles of CSF flow oscillating at 80 cycles/min. Pressure gradients and velocities were compared for 8 levels extending from the posterior fossa to the C3-4 level. Relative pressures and peak velocities were plotted by level from the posterior fossa to C3-4. The heterogeneity of flow velocity distribution around the spinal cord was compared between models. Peak systolic velocities were generally lower in the postoperative models than in the preoperative CM model. With the 2 larger surgical defects, peak systolic velocities were brought closer to normal model velocities (equal values at C-3 and C-4) than with the smallest surgical defect. For the smallest defect, peak velocities were decreased, but not to levels in the normal model. In the postoperative models, heterogeneity in flow velocity distribution around the spinal cord increased from normal model levels as the degree of decompression increased. Pressures in the 5 models differed in magnitude and in pattern. Pressure gradients along the spinal canal in the normal and CM models were nonlinear, with steeper gradients below C3-4 than above. The CM model had a steeper pressure gradient than the normal model above C3-4 and the

  12. Relationship of syrinx size and tonsillar descent to spinal deformity in Chiari malformation Type I with associated syringomyelia

    PubMed Central

    Godzik, Jakub; Kelly, Michael P.; Radmanesh, Alireza; Kim, David; Holekamp, Terrence F.; Smyth, Matthew D.; Lenke, Lawrence G.; Shimony, Joshua S.; Park, Tae Sung; Leonard, Jeffrey; Limbrick, David D.

    2014-01-01

    Object Chiari malformation Type I (CM-I) is a developmental abnormality often associated with a spinal syrinx. Patients with syringomyelia are known to have an increased risk of scoliosis, yet the influence of specific radiographically demonstrated features on the prevalence of scoliosis remains unclear. The primary objective of the present study was to investigate the relationship of maximum syrinx diameter and tonsillar descent to the presence of scoliosis in patients with CM-I–associated syringomyelia [AQ? Edit okay? If not, please advise. JG: edit correct]. A secondary objective was to explore the role of craniovertebral junction (CVJ) characteristics for additional risk factors for scoliosis. Methods The authors conducted a retrospective review of pediatric patients evaluated for CM-I with syringomyelia at a single institution in the period from 2000 to 2012. Syrinx morphology and CVJ parameters were evaluated with MRI, whereas the presence of scoliosis was determined using standard radiographic criteria. Multiple logistic regression was used to analyze radiological features that were independently associated with scoliosis. Results Ninety-two patients with CM-I and syringomyelia were identified. The mean age was 10.5 ± 5 years. Thirty-five (38%) of 92 patients had spine deformity; 23 (66%) of these 35 were referred primarily for deformity, and 12 (34%) were diagnosed with deformity during workup for other symptoms. Multiple regression analysis revealed maximum syrinx diameter > 6 mm (OR 12.1, 95% CI 3.63–40.57, p < 0.001) and moderate (5–12 mm) rather than severe (> 12 mm) tonsillar herniation (OR 7.64, 95% CI 2.3–25.31, p = 0.001) as significant predictors of spine deformity when controlling for age, sex, and syrinx location. Conclusions The current study further elucidates the association between CM-I and spinal deformity by defining specific radiographic characteristics associated with the presence of scoliosis. Specifically, patients presenting

  13. Unusual association of Arnold-Chiari malformation and vitamin B12 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Verma, Rajesh; Praharaj, Heramba Narayan

    2012-07-09

    Arnold-Chiari malformations are a group of congenital or acquired defects associated with the displacement of cerebellar tonsils into the spinal canal. First described by Chiari (1891), this has various grades of severity and involves various parts of neuraxis, for example, cerebellum and its outputs, neuro-otological system, lower cranial nerves, spinal sensory and motor pathways. The symptomatology of Arnold-Chiari malformations may mimic multiple sclerosis, primary headache syndromes, spinal tumours and benign intracranial hypertension. We highlighted a case of Chiari type I malformation, who presented with posterolateral ataxia associated with significant vitamin B(12) deficiency. The patient was supplemented with vitamin B(12) injections and showed remarkable improvement at follow-up after 3 months.

  14. Surgical experience in 130 pediatric patients with Chiari I malformations.

    PubMed

    Tubbs, R Shane; McGirt, Matthew J; Oakes, W Jerry

    2003-08-01

    The aim of this study was to present the long-term findings of a surgical series of pediatric patients with Chiari I malformations. One hundred thirty symptomatic pediatric patients with Chiari I malformations underwent posterior fossa decompression. The age in this group of patients ranged from 2 months to 20 years (mean 11 years). The length of the hospital stay extended from 2 to 7 days (mean 2.7 days), and follow up was from 3 months to 15 years (mean 4.2 years). Patients most often presented with headache/neck pain (38%) and scoliosis (18%). Examples of associated diagnoses included neurofibromatosis Type 1 (5.5%), hydrocephalus (11%), idiopathic growth hormone deficiency (5.5%), and Klippel-Feil anomaly (5%). Syringes were present in 58% of patients. Seventeen percent of patients had caudal displacement of the brainstem and fourth ventricle. Postoperative relief of preoperative pathologies was experienced in 83% of patients. Of the most common presenting symptoms--headache/neck pain and scoliosis--12 and 17%, respectively, were not alleviated postoperatively. Complications occurred in 2.3% of this group and included the development of acute hydrocephalus postoperatively and severe life-threatening signs of brainstem compression that necessitated a transoral odontoidectomy. Nine patients have had to undergo repeated operations for continued symptoms or persistent large syringes. During surgery 10 patients (7.7%) were found to have arachnoid veils occluding the fourth ventricular outlet, and nine of these had syringomyelia. In our experience almost all syringes will stabilize or improve with posterior fossa decompression and duraplasty. The authors believe this to be the largest reported series of pediatric patients who have undergone posterior fossa decompression for Chiari I malformations.

  15. A Systematic Review of Chiari I Malformation: Techniques and Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jian-Lan; Li, Mei-Hua; Wang, Chun-Liang; Meng, Wei

    2016-04-01

    To elucidate the most efficacious treatments of Chiari I malformation (CIM). A literature search was performed using PubMed, CINAHL/Ovid, Cochrane library, and the Elsevier database. The key words "Chiari I malformation," "Chiari malformation type I," "surgery," and "treatment" were used for the search. Articles had to be peer reviewed and provide primary outcomes measured by clinical and radiographic outcomes after surgical treatments. Exclusion criteria included non-English-language articles, case reports, commentaries, information from textbooks and expert opinions, and articles that did not provide outcomes concerning specific surgical methods. Patients included were classified into 4 groups according the procedure: only bony decompression but not duroplasty (group I), bony decompression plus duroplasty (group II), bony decompression plus the resection of tonsils (group III), and shunt (group IV). Eighteen studies were identified. Groups II and III had a significantly higher improvement rate (82.25%, 86.10%, P < 0.05) of outcomes with regard to clinical signs and symptoms than the other groups. Group IV showed a statistically higher rate (30.49%, P < 0.05) of aggregating clinical signs and symptoms. In patients with syringomyelia, group III showed better clinical improvement (96.08%). Group II displayed a significantly higher rate of decrease in the size of cavities (83.33%, P < 0.05). Group IV had a statistically higher rate of increase in the size of cavities (33.87%, P < 0.05). Only bony decompression cannot achieve satisfactory outcomes. Bony decompression plus duroplasty showed the most favorable outcomes. Resection of tonsils was not recommended because of the high rate of side effects. Shunt may aggregate clinical signs and symptoms and increase the size of cavities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Syndrome of occipitoatlantoaxial hypermobility, cranial settling, and chiari malformation type I in patients with hereditary disorders of connective tissue.

    PubMed

    Milhorat, Thomas H; Bolognese, Paolo A; Nishikawa, Misao; McDonnell, Nazli B; Francomano, Clair A

    2007-12-01

    Chiari malformation Type I (CM-I) is generally regarded as a disorder of the paraxial mesoderm. The authors report an association between CM-I and hereditary disorders of connective tissue (HDCT) that can present with lower brainstem symptoms attributable to occipitoatlantoaxial hypermobility and cranial settling. The prevalence of HDCT was determined in a prospectively accrued cohort of 2813 patients with CM-I. All patients underwent a detailed medical and neuroradiological workup that included an assessment of articular mobility. Osseous structures composing the craniocervical junction were investigated morphometrically using reconstructed 3D computed tomography and plain x-ray images in 114 patients with HDCT/CM-I, and the results were compared with those obtained in patients with CM-I (55 cases) and healthy control individuals (55 cases). The diagnostic criteria for Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and related HDCT were met in 357 (12.7%) of the 2813 cases. Hereditability was generally compatible with a pattern of autosomal dominant transmission with variable expressivity. The diagnostic features of HDCT/CM-I were distinguished from those of CM-I by clinical stigmata of connective tissue disease, a greater female preponderance (8:1 compared with 3:1, p < 0.001), and a greater incidence of lower brainstem symptoms (0.41 compared with 0.11, p < 0.001), retroodontoid pannus formation (0.71 compared with 0.11, p < 0.001), and hypoplasia of the oropharynx (0.44 compared with 0.02, p < 0.001). Measurements of the basion-dens interval, basion-atlas interval, atlas-dens interval, dens-atlas interval, clivus-atlas angle, clivus-axis angle, and atlas-axis angle were the same in the supine and upright positions in healthy control individuals and patients with CM-I. In patients with HDCT/CM-I, there was a reduction of the basion-dens interval (3.6 mm, p < 0.001), an enlargement of the basion-atlas interval (3.0 mm, p < 0.001), and a reduction of the clivus-axis angle (10.8 degrees

  17. Contiguous triple spinal dysraphism associated with Chiari malformation Type II and hydrocephalus: an embryological conundrum between the unified theory of Pang and the unified theory of McLone.

    PubMed

    Dhandapani, Sivashanmugam; Srinivasan, Anirudh

    2016-01-01

    Triple spinal dysraphism is extremely rare. There are published reports of multiple discrete neural tube defects with intervening normal segments that are explained by the multisite closure theory of primary neurulation, having an association with Chiari malformation Type II consistent with the unified theory of McLone. The authors report on a 1-year-old child with contiguous myelomeningocele and lipomyelomeningocele centered on Type I split cord malformation with Chiari malformation Type II and hydrocephalus. This composite anomaly is probably due to select abnormalities of the neurenteric canal during gastrulation, with a contiguous cascading impact on both dysjunction of the neural tube and closure of the neuropore, resulting in a small posterior fossa, probably bringing the unified theory of McLone closer to the unified theory of Pang.

  18. Case Report: Acute obstructive hydrocephalus associated with infratentorial extra-axial fluid collection following foramen magnum decompression and durotomy for Chiari malformation type I

    PubMed Central

    Munakomi, Sunil; Bhattarai, Binod; Chaudhary, Pramod

    2016-01-01

    Acute obstructive hydrocephalus due to infratentorial extra-axial fluid collection (EAFC) is an extremely rare complication of foramen magnum decompression (FMD) and durotomy for Chiari malformation type I. Presence of infratentorial  EAFC invariably causes obstruction at the level of the fourth ventricle or aqueduct of Silvius, thereby indicating its definitive role in hydrocephalus. Pathogenesis of EAFC is said to be a local arachnoid tear as a result of durotomy, as this complication is not described in FMD without durotomy. Controversy exists in management. Usually EAFC is said to resolve with conservative management; so hydrocephalus doesn’t require treatment. However, in this case EAFC was progressive and ventriculo-peritoneal shunting (VPS) was needed for managing progressive and symptomatic hydrocephalus. PMID:27303624

  19. Sports participation with Chiari I malformation.

    PubMed

    Strahle, Jennifer; Geh, Ndi; Selzer, Béla J; Bower, Regina; Himedan, Mai; Strahle, MaryKathryn; Wetjen, Nicholas M; Muraszko, Karin M; Garton, Hugh J L; Maher, Cormac O

    2016-04-01

    OBJECT There is currently no consensus on the safety of sports participation for patients with Chiari I malformation (CM-I). The authors' goal was to define the risk of sports participation for children with the imaging finding of CM-I. METHODS A prospective survey was administered to 503 CM-I patients at 2 sites over a 46-month period. Data were gathered on imaging characteristics, treatment, sports participation, and any sport-related injuries. Additionally, 81 patients completed at least 1 subsequent survey following their initial entry into the registry and were included in a prospective group, with a mean prospective follow-up period of 11 months. RESULTS Of the 503 CM-I patients, 328 participated in sports for a cumulative duration of 4641 seasons; 205 of these patients participated in contact sports. There were no serious or catastrophic neurological injuries. One patient had temporary extremity paresthesias that resolved within hours, and this was not definitely considered to be related to the CM-I. In the prospective cohort, there were no permanent neurological injuries. CONCLUSIONS No permanent or catastrophic neurological injuries were observed in CM-I patients participating in athletic activities. The authors believe that the risk of such injuries is low and that, in most cases, sports participation by children with CM-I is safe.

  20. The Role of Cine Flow Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Patients with Chiari 0 Malformation.

    PubMed

    Ozsoy, Kerem Mazhar; Oktay, Kadir; Cetinalp, Nuri Eralp; Gezercan, Yurdal; Erman, Tahsin

    2016-12-14

    The aim of this study was to define the role of phase-contrast cine magnetic resonance imaging in deciding the therapeutic strategy and underlying pathophysiology resulting in syrinx formation in patients with Chiari type 0 malformation. Seven patients admitted to our clinic with diagnosis of Chiari 0 malformations during the period January 2005 to July 2016 were enrolled in the study. All patients underwent a detailed preoperative neurological examination. The entire neuroaxis magnetic resonance imaging and phase-contrast cine magnetic resonance imaging was obtained preoperatively and postoperatively. Seven patients (5 female and 2 male) cover the inclusion criteria of the Chiari type 0. All of the patients with Chiari type 0 malformation had absent cine flow at the craniovertebral junction except two patients. All these five patients underwent surgical interventions; suboccipital decompression and duraplasty. All of them showed both clinical and imaging improvements postoperatively. Cine flow magnetic resonance imaging appears to be a useful tool in the management of patients with Chiari 0 malformations. There was a good correlation between the clinical presentation and cine flow preoperatively, and between clinical improvement and cine flow postoperatively.

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vendredi 1er avril 2011, par webmaster

23 rue du Simplon 75018 Paris - Tel : 01 42 55 31 05



23 rue du Simplon
75018 Paris
Tel : 01 42 55 31 05


Prota Nikola Škrbić
Email : eglspc@club-internet.fr

Otac Slaviša Šanjić
Tel : 06 22 03 56 61


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